GRIMSTOCK

Longways for six; in three parts (2nd Ed., 1652).

MUSICMOVEMENTS



First Part.
A11–4All lead up a double and fall back a double to places (r.s.).
5–8Partners set and turn single.
A21–8All that again.
B1First and second couples change places, first couple going down between the second (sk.s.).
2First and third couples change places, third couple coming up between the first (sk.s.).
3–4Second and third couples change places, second couple going down between the third (sk.s.).
5First and second couples change places, first couple coming up between the second (sk.s.).
6First and third couples change places, third couple going down between the first (sk.s.).
7–8Second and third couples change places, second couple coming up between the third (sk.s.).



Second Part.
A11–4Partners side (r.s.).
5–8Partners set and turn single.
A21–8All that again.
B1–8Same as B in First Part, partners facing each other with both hands joined.



Third Part.
A11–4Partners arm with the right.
5–8Partners set and turn single.
A21–8Partners arm with the left, set and turn single.
B1First man changes places with first woman, passing by the left (sk.s.).
2–4Half the Straight hey-for-three (Fig.12, p.54) on each side (sk.s.).
5First man changes places with first woman, passing by the right (sk.s.).
6–8Half the Straight hey-for-three on each side to places (sk.s.).

The first figure is simply a mirror ("Grimstock") hey; the second is generally done as the same, but instead of just taking inside hands with partner to lead in from the ends, face partner take two hands and slip sideways (pushing apart when you get to the middle to let the far couple slip in. Cecil Sharp may well have intended people to slip under a two-handed arch, but I've never seen anyone try.
I think Playford's words "obviously" say: mirror hey; dip and dive; cross hey (i.e. with ones crossing as they lead in each time from the ends).

Page transcribed by Hugh Stewart