HEY, BOYS, UP GO WE

For four; in three parts (1st Ed., 1650). Couple facing couple, first couple with their backs to the men's wall.

MUSICMOVEMENTS



First Part.
A1–4Couples move forward a double and fall back a double to places (r.s.).
5–8That again.
B11–4First man and second woman whole-gip facing outward, clockwise (Fig. 9, p.48); while second man and first woman do the same (r.s.).
5–8First man and second woman whole-gip facing centre, counter-clockwise (Fig. 8, p.48); while second man and first woman do the same (r.s.).
B21–4First man and first woman whole-gip facing outward, clockwise; while second man and second woman do the same (r.s.).
5–8First man and first woman whole-gip facing centre, counter-clockwise; while second man and second woman do the same (r.s.).



Second Part.
A1–4Partners side (r.s.).
5–8First man and second woman side; while second man and first woman do the same.
B11–2Two men change places (r.s.).
3–4Two women do the same.
3–8Hands-four once round.
B21–2Two women change places (r.s.).
3–4Two men do the same.
3–8Hands-four once round to places.



Third Part.
A1–4Partners arm with the right.
5–8First man and second woman arm with the left; while second man and first woman do the same.
B11–4First man and second woman, and second man and first woman half-pousette (r.s.), and change places (Fig.6, p.45).
5–8First man turns outward to his right and, followed by his partner, casts off and returns up the middle to the same place; while second man casts off to his right, and, followed by his partner, does the same (r.s.).
B21–4Same as B1 to places (r.s).
5–8Same as B1, each man casting off to his left, and, followed by his partner, returning up the middle to his place (r.s.).

[Cecil Sharp seized on a confusion about similar tunes to rename this dance from “Cuckolds All A-Row” to Hey Boys — presumably because he thought his Victorian readers would not appreciate the original title. There is another dance Playford called “Hey, Boys, up go we”, which Douglas and Helen Kennedy had to publish as “The Way to Norwich” in the Country Dance, Book new Series. (There doesn’t seem to be a Playford dance “The Way to Norwich” so we are spared further confusion.)

The Round generally interprets the First Part to be gypsy corner right and left, then partner right and left.]

Page transcribed by Hugh Stewart